Agenda - Monday, March 30, 2020


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Tips and Tools When Working with Elected Officials

1.0 Advanced

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Overview

Tobacco 21 (T21) is a national campaign that seeks to raise the legal sale age for all tobacco-related products from 18 to 21 years. Support from the general public has been documented in national surveys, but little is known about support among government officials. Health officers and commissioners in charge of local and district health departments play a crucial role in the development of policies that protect their communities from the harms of tobacco (Winnail & Bartee, 2002). Therefore, this study aims to determine their support, perceptions, and attitudes towards T21 advocacy. A 27-question electronic survey, based on the Health Belief Model, was sent to all local health officers/commissioners in Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio (n=183). IBM SPSS software will be used to calculate descriptive statistics and chi-square goodness-of-fit tests. Results will provide insight into the role of local health officers/commissioners in T21 policy advocacy for the goal of reducing tobacco use.

Learning Objectives

1. Describe the practices and opinions of local health officials regarding advocacy efforts toward achieving Tobacco 21 policies in their states and communities.
2. State two ways in which local health officials can increase their knowledge and actions with Tobacco 21 policies advocacy.
3. Summarize why local health officials need to be at the forefront of Tobacco 21 and other advocacy efforts.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Kathleen Middleton, MS, MCHES®

Perceptions and Practices of Local Health Officers/ Commissioners Regarding Tobacco 21 Policy Advocacy 
Erica Payton, PhD, MPH

Cluster Analysis of County Commissioners’ Perceptions of Local Level Firearm Violence Interventions 
Heidi Hancher-Rauch, PhD, CHES®, Daryn Papenfuse, MPH and Ruben Juarez, BS

Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The Latest on Bullying and Recent Research Results

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Overview

In any given 24 hour period of time … 4 million workers in the USA are bullied in their workplaces. Stress-related health problems are experienced by 45% of those who are bullied at work. The health care costs associated with bullying drive up health insurance costs and rates to employers resulting in more than $60 billion dollars every year. Workplace bullying is a silent epidemic that public health must address. This session will focus on bringing workplace bullying to a deeper awareness and understanding for public health professionals. Prevention efforts will be shared, and strategies developed during this session to stop workplace bullying and create health workplace culture. Through the power of many public health professionals we can elevate health by ending workplace bullying.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Recognize the signs and symptoms of workplace bullying on the victim and the behaviors of the bullies in the workplace.
2. Describe strategies for improving the health and lives of victims of workplace bullying.
3. Review employer handbooks, policies, and procedures to help employers end workplace bullying and improve the US workplace climate.
4. Advocate for federal and state laws that will end workplace bullying."

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator 
R. Debra Shapiro, PhD. MS, MCHES®

If 4 Million Americans Experience This Every Day, Why Is Public Health Not Involved?
Lori Dewald, EdD, ATC, MCHES®, F-AAHE

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Practical Applications and Best Practices for Health Promotion Materials

1.0 Entry

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Overview

Significant resources are invested in the production of research and evidence-based knowledge with the final objective of integrating research evidence into practice. Toolkits provide concrete resources used for supporting individual behavior change and practices of community members, healthcare practitioners, patients, community and health organizations as well as policy makers. In this workshop, we will explore key components for an effective toolkit use.  Drawing on implementation science, participants will learn four approaches on how to select, adapt, implement and evaluate the best toolkit for their work and community context. Two concrete toolkit examples will be presented. The group will brainstorm ways to optimize the use of these toolkits, what additional resources are needed and discuss significance and success of toolkits they have used or developed.

Learning Objective:

1. List three different data/information resources that can be utilized when creating program materials.
2. Evaluate the effectiveness of collateral materials.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Linda E. Forys, MEd, MCHES®

You Have a Toolkit—Now What? Practical Applications for Creating, Editing and Disseminating Program Collateral Materials
Jody R Steinhardt, MPH, CHES® and Cherylee Sherry, MPH, MCHES®

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

School Health: Nutrition & Physical Activity

1.5 Advanced

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Overview

The health behaviors and outcomes of children are highly influenced by parents and caregivers (P&C). Research emphasizes P&C engagement as positively related to academic achievement. School efforts to promote learning and health among students have been shown to be more successful when P&C are involved. “Read By 3rd” is an educational outreach program which teaches P&C to serve as educators in the home using engaging instructional strategies. Presenters will demonstrate sample activities and discuss how trainings directly support the Family Engagement and Community Involvement components of the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model.

Learning Objectives:

1. Describe the importance of promoting positive health behaviors through parent/caregiver engagement.

2. Explain how training parents/caregivers to be home educators supports the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator 
Deborah Fortune, PhD, FAAHE

Read by 3rd: A Model to Promote Parental Involvement, Healthy Eating, and Reading Proficiency 

Elisa Beth McNeill, PhD, CHES and Meagan Shipley, PhD, CHES

Preliminary Findings from a Text Message Strategy to Improve Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Behaviors Among Rural Middle School Caregivers

Annie Loyd, MPH, RDN, CHES® and Brittany McCormick, DHSC, MPH

Changing Minds and Plates: Farm to Early Care and Education in Georgia

Abbie Chaddick, MS, RDN

Integrating Nutrition Education Throughout the School Environment to Support Student Achievement

Caitlin Merlo, MPH, RD and Nancy Brenowitz Katz, MS, RDN 

Agenda - Wednesday, April 1, 2020


ESG Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Engaging in Health Education Practice

1.5 Entry

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Overview

Approximately 25% of college females and 15% of college males experience sexual assault, while nearly 75% of all college students experience sexual harassment. Of the sexual assault and harassment incidents that occur on college campuses, 90% go unreported. The #MeToo event aimed to empower survivors, educate students and faculty, and raise awareness surrounding sexual assault, harassment, and consent. Findings highlight the need for incorporating sexual assault and harassment awareness and advocacy efforts within pre-service health professionals’ student organizations as these may lead to increase self-efficacy, competency, and professional preparedness.

Learning objectives:

1. Discuss the importance of hosting events like the #MeToo event when addressing sexual assault, harassment, and consent on college campuses.
2. Describe how implementing the #MeToo event or similar activities contribute to pre-service health professionals’ increased self-efficacy and professional development and brainstorm opportunities for the #MeToo event or similar activities within local campus and community health settings.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator 
Skye McDonald, MS, CHES®

Advocating for Survivors & Increasing Awareness: #Be SoMEone Too
Caitlin Holden, MS, CHES®, Meagan Shipley, PhD, CHES® and Cori S. Strahan, BS, CHES®

Menstrual Health at a Midwest School: How is the Diva Cup Impacting Menstruation within College Students?

Lillian Minor, BS, Samantha A. Zahurones, CAN, BLS/CPR and Kiley R. Klauer, BSc

Engaging Online Students in Health Education Practice

Holly T. Moses, PhD, MCHES® and Erik Johansen, BS


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Law and Public Health

1.0 Advanced

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Overview

Laws are designed have impact on environments and behavior, and have complex impacts on the social determinants of health. Law and policy strategies play an increasingly important role in addressing public health threats such as childhood obesity, healthcare-associated infections, and prescription drug overdoses. In the complex environment where policy and law impact public health programs and outcomes, it is critical for public health practitioners across specialties to be competent in the use public health law as an innovative tool to further aims of their organizations. Health educators are fundamental to continuing education of the public health workforce and community partners, and the most critical competency gap to fill surrounds public health law.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Participants will be able to describe the role of law as a public health tool.
2. Participants will be able to define key legal concepts and terms germane to public health law.
3. Participants will understand the impact of law as a social determinant of health.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Cynthia A. Karlsson, MS, CHES®

The Legal Lens: A Perspective to Address Inequalities in Public Health
Brianne Yassine, MPH, CHES®

Law as a Structural and Social Determinant of Health
Samantha Bent Weber, PhD, JD

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

How to Maximize Non-profit Management

1.0 Advanced

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Overview

A non-profit organization serving low-income students has identified an effective, sustainable process for improving healthy physical activity and nutrition behaviors. The organization has expanded in its 15 plus years from a staff of two to almost 50; from servicing eight schools to 491 sites; from working with only schools to servicing 169 K-12 schools, 201 early child care centers, 24 after school programs, and 36 community retail sites located in food deserts. While the non-profit uses the traditional planning model, we recognize a number of factors essential for maximizing the efficiency of a non-profit organizations serving low income populations: partners, data driven programming, communication plan; & attention to continuous improvement at the organizational & client level. The session will expand the discussion of the program, the strategies & provide 2019 behavior data along with a summary of policy, systems and environmental changes occurring at client sites.

Learning Objective:

1. Describe key strategies for improving organization effectiveness in promoting social justice.
2. Identify key strategies to promote physical activity and nutrition to low income students and families.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Jagdish Khubchandani, PhD

Key Strategies for Managing and Maximizing a Non-Profit Organization Serving Low Income Students
Diane Allensworth, PhD and Christi Kay, MA

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Envisioning a Tobacco-free World: Strategies to Achieve Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Equity Across the Lifespan

1.5 Entry

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Overview

Despite the Surgeon General releasing the landmark Smoking and Health report in 1964 linking smoking to specific diseases, tobacco disparities persist. One in five deaths are due to tobacco and across all tobacco products, American Indian/Alaska Natives have the highest prevalence at 29.8%, followed by Whites (21.4%), Blacks (20.1%), Hispanics (12.7%), and Asians (8.9%). In response to these persistent disparities, the FDA Office of Minority Health and Health Equity sponsored a journal supplement in Health Promotion Practice titled Tobacco and Health Equity to capture public health practices that show promise in addressing tobacco cessation and prevention through innovative programs, strategies, and policies. This session will highlight these key research and practice notes from the field that were featured journal released in January 2020. Presenters will share their findings that support reducing tobacco use among racial and ethnic minorities, under-served, and under-represented groups across the United States. 

Learning Objectives: 

1. Be able to describe two tobacco cessation or prevention interventions. 
2. Be able to list disparities among tobacco use among racial and ethnic, under-served, and under-represented groups. 

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Jovonni R. Spinner, MPH, CHES®

Tobacco Disparities and FDA’s Position on Tobacco
Jovonni Spinner, MPH, CHES®

Socioeconomic Disparities in Vape Shop Density and Proximity to Public Schools in the United States
Dilip Venugopal, PhD

Keeping in Fresh with Hip Hop Teens: Promising Targeting Strategies for Delivering Public Health Messages in Too Hard to Reach Audiences
Merrybelle Guo, MPH

DEJELO YA Media Campaign Connects Spanish Speaking Communities to Effective Support for Quitting Tobacco
Maria Otero, BS

Smoking Among U.S. Service Members Following Transition from Military to Veteran Status
Chiping Nieh, PhD

Agenda -Friday, April 3, 2020


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

College Health and Wellness

1.5 Entry

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Overview

Utah law prohibits sexual surveys in schools, leading to an emotional, rather than research-based legislative response. The purpose of this study was to use data from college students to give an accurate perception of sexual practices of Utah youth. Freshmen and sophomore college students, ages 18-21, were randomly selected to complete a 75-question online survey (n=860). Almost half of participants had ever had sexual intercourse, many before age 17, and with multiple partners. Recent sexual behaviors included: 28% oral, 28% vaginal, and 5% anal. Students ranked parents as the most important source of sex education, despite 32% indicating poor quality education from parents. Friends and the internet were the highest quality education they received, and sexual knowledge from the population was lacking. These results indicate a problematic dyad of sexual behavior without adequate sexual knowledge. The Utah youth are sexually engaged, but without the knowledge to make healthy choices.

Learning Objectives:
1. By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to identify sexual behaviors of young adults in Utah not previously documented in the YRBSS.  
2. By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to analyze assessment findings and assess social, environmental, and political conditions that may impact health education."

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator 
TeriSue Smith-Jackson, PhD, MPH

Filling the Missing Gap in Utah’s YRBSS Data: Assessing the Sexual Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior of College Students
TeriSue Smith-Jackson, PhD, MPH

Sustain-a-BULL Future: A Program to Reduce Food Waste Generated by Undergraduate Students at University Dining Halls
Melissa Miller, MPH and Kyle Marie Jacobsen, MPH 

Using Stories of Student Food Insecurity to Support and Advocate for Change on a College Campus
Jessie Dexter, MPA and Ellen Shafer, PhD, MPH, MCHES®

Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

School Health: Advocacy & Policy

1.5 Entry

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Overview

In 2016, the California Healthy Youth Act (CHYA) commenced, mandating that all public secondary schools implement comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). Opposition to this policy has undermined and even stymied CSE in several school districts. In response to such resistance, and to galvanize the 89% of California parents who support CSE (Constantine, Herman, & Huang, 2007), the CHYA 4 All Playbook has been created. The Playbook 4 All clarifies what CHYA is, provides empirically-driven justification for CSE programs, dispels circulating myths, and suggests ways various stakeholders can advocate for compliant CHYA implementation. Furthermore, this playbook aims to deconstruct messages of hate utilized against the LGBTQ+ community that lie behind CHYA opposition. The Playbook is adaptable for various stakeholders and is intended to be used far and wide, as a lack of CSE implementation in the U.S. is commonplace despite a vast majority (93%) of parental support (Kantor & Levitz, 2017).

Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify forums for promoting and/or supporting comprehensive sexuality education in one's community. 
2. Explain reasoning for comprehensive sexuality education in one's community. 
3. Differentiate between sexual risk avoidance and comprehensive sexuality education programming.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Eryn Greaney

Elevating Beyond Programming: Using Policy, System and Environmental Changes to Promote Healthy School Environments
Chris Stewart, CHES® 

Public School Comprehensive Sexuality Education Resistance Response: A Playbook for A
Kelli Bourne, MPH, MEd

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

What Youth Need and How Schools Can Help

1.0 Advanced

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Overview

In this session, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) will provide an overview of their emerging and existing research priorities, explain how CDC/DASH uses research, evaluation, and surveillance to inform programmatic efforts, and familiarize participants with ways to build on CDC/DASH research findings and data systems for their work. Participants will describe current and upcoming projects spanning a range of adolescent sexual health issues, including school-based sexual health education, enhancing sexual health services for adolescents, creating safe and supportive school environments, and sexual and gender minority youth health. This snapshot of CDC/DASH’s efforts will highlight for participants emerging and current priorities in adolescent sexual health and related school-based intervention strategies, as well as federal resources to enhance the work of public health education professionals.

Learning Objectives:

1. By the end of the session, the participant will be able to describe at least three emerging or current research priorities for CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health.
2. By the end of the session, the participant will be able to identify at least two tools, publications, or other resources available from CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health that can support research and practice for public health education professionals.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Paula Jayne, PhD, MPH

Sexual Health Education for Transgender Youth: What Youth Need and How Schools Can Help
Leigh Szucs, PhD, CHES® and Paula Jayne, PhD, MPH

CDC’s Division of Adolescent and School Health’s Emerging and Ongoing Research, Evaluation, and Surveillance Priorities to Inform Program Implementation 
Lisa C. Barrios, ScM, DrPH

Poster Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Poster Promenade 2A

1.0 Entry

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Overview

Poster Promenade- This session is available for 1.0 Entry Level CECH, applied to both CHES, CPH and MCHES.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator

Erica Payton, PhD, CHES®

Exploring the Impact of Storytelling on Storytellers in a Hepatitis B Health Communication
Rebeca Almeida

Examining College Students' Use, Perceptions, and Knowledge of Marijuana and Marijuana Laws
Meghan Burroughs, PhD, MA, CHES

Using Windshield Surveys as an Assessment Tool: Assessing Neighborhood Risks and Protective Factors for Violence
Erica Payton, PhD, CHES®