Agenda - Monday, March 23, 2020


Late Breaking Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

70 Years of Experience - How Should SOPHE Meet the Challenges of the Future?

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This session will highlight accomplishments of SOPHE's past 70 years, identify trends and innovations that can impact SOPHE's future, and dialogue with diverse professionals on how SOPHE should address these future challenges to fulfill its mission.

What are Three Potential Contributions of SOPHE & What are Three Future Challenges Facing Health Education Professionals 

Agenda and Speakers

 70 Years of Experience - How Should SOPHE Meet the Challenges of the Future?
Julia Mary Alber, PhD, MPH, Jean Breny, PhD, MPH, John P. Allegrante, PhD, Michelle L. Carvalho, MPH, MCHES®, Cynthia Karlsson, MPH, CHES®, Ashley E. Kennedy Mitchell, DrPH, MSPH and Carlos E. Rodríguez-Díaz, PhD, MPHE, MCHES®

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

The Art of Teaching

1.5 Advanced

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Teacher preparation programs have an important responsibility to develop competent educators who have the capacity to be successful in the classroom. This presentation will describe a health education teacher preparation program that uses high impact practices (HIPs) as the foundation for pre-service educator training. The presenters will discuss strategies for scaffolding HIPs and tips for designing authentic experiences, particularly related to online portfolio development, to address the current trends in professional preparation. The demand for competent educators has never been greater, and teacher preparation programs must be willing to go beyond traditional training in order to adequately prepare the next generation of school health educators to serve as catalysts for change in addressing inequities and advocating for social justice.

Learning Objective:

1. Describe examples of high impact practices in professional preparation programs
2. Examine strategies for implementing high impact practices and developing pre-service educators’ professional knowledge, skills, and behaviors
3. Discuss the pros and cons of using high impact practices as the foundation for professional preparation programs

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Amanda Lynch, MS, MCHES®

Evolving Professional Preparation Programs through Constructivist Pedagogy
Meagan Shipley, PhD, CHES® and Elisa "Beth" McNeill, PhD, CHES®

Demystifying Health Advocacy Using a Layered Approach During Undergraduate Training for Public Health Education Majors
Heidi Hancher-Rauch, PhD, Angelitta Britt-Spells, PhD, MPH, Amie Wojtyna, PhD, MPH and Sara Kwiatkowski, BS

Formative Assessment: A Powerful Process for Improving Learning
Rebecca Foco, PhD, MCHES®


Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Arts & Public Health in America: Creating Healthy Communities

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Innovation is taking root at the intersections of art, culture, public health, and community development throughout the United States. The Creating Healthy Communities: Arts + Public Health in America initiative, a national partnership between the University of Florida Center for Arts in Medicine and ArtPlace America is designed to accelerate this innovation. The translational initiative engages a comprehensive agenda of research, knowledge-sharing, collaboration, publication and resource building to drive significant advancements in community health through evidence-based engagement of the arts and culture. The session will overview the initiative and share findings from national working group convenings, surveys, focus groups and evidence synthesis. It is intended to offer ways that public health students, educators and professionals can engage with the arts and culture to improve the cultural competence of health education and potentially improve the health outcomes of diverse populations.   

Public health is becoming increasingly cognizant of the broad forces that shape health and the need to address these through through a “fifth wave” approach - supporting the cultural conditions that favor health equity (Hanlon, Carlisle, Hannah, Reilly, & Lyon, 2011). As the discipline embraces a socio-ecological perspective and moves back its focus from considering health as being determined primarily by individual-level decisions, public health education is faced with the call to contribute to relevant and innovative multi-sector interventions. The arts and culture have historically been woven into making social issues visible and acting as a catalyst for change. As public health education broadens its focus, collaborations between the arts and health education are increasingly important. 
The arts and culture play an important role in how diverse groups of stakeholders create and thrive within the conditions that produce health outcomes. This session presents theoretical reflections, practical examples and empirical findings of work exploring how the arts and culture are engaged in public health. In addition, it investigates the unexplored assets, potential challenges, and future directions of collaborations. Following this session, participants will be able to articulate the value of the arts in public health education to build a culture of health. In addition, participants will reflect upon a national initiative for building more cross-sector collaboration between the arts and public health to improve community health and wellbeing in the United States.

Learning Objectives: 

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

1) Articulate the value of the arts in public health education to build a culture of health.
2) Evaluation valuate a national initiative for building cross sector collaboration between the arts and public health to improve community health in the United States.


Moderator
Kathleen Roe, DrPH, MPH

Presenters
Jill Sonke, PhD, MA, Kelly Cornett, MS, Shanae Burch, Ed.M

Agenda - Wednesday, March 25, 2020


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Public Health Ethics and Strategy

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I. Content: Ethical principles (rules, norms, and values) relevant to the practice of public health
II. Issues: The kinds and recurrent instances of ethical challenges public officials face
III. Systematic procedure: Stepwise approach to addressing the ethical dilemmas and challenges that arise in public health practice
IV. Standard practice: An upstream, ethics-in-all-policies approach to  planning and decision making

Learning Objectives:

1) Describe the main activities of CDC’s Public Health Ethics Unit Distinguish public health ethics from everyday morality, other practical fields of ethics, and compliance ethics Layout a fourfold approach for defining public health ethics.
2) Show how ethical decision making can help design and justify intervention options that resonate with stakeholder, community, and public health values

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Cherylee Sherry, MPH, MCHES®

Speaker
Leonard Ortmann, PhD

Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Cross-Sector Outreach and Collaboration: Lessons from the Field

1.0 Advanced

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Changes to the global climate are creating public health impacts that already are being felt in communities across the United States. Public health departments have an important role to play in local climate adaptation planning. Join the social marketing and communication experts from Marketing for Change, along with CDC staff, to learn how to effectively engage with sectors outside the usual public health circles. This interactive workshop will share new guidance from CDC's Climate and Health Program on cross-sector collaboration, along with best practices and key messages that any health educator can apply to their work. Participants will work in small groups to develop an outreach plan tailored for their community or organization. Participants will use materials developed for the Climate-Ready States and Cities Initiative to map resources, set priorities and begin creating an outreach plan for a coordinated community response to climate and health adaptation.

Learning Objectives: 

1 Describe the constructs of the Health Belief Model utilized in focus group study described in the session. 
2) Summarize key themes and conclusions from the focus group study described in the session. 
3) Identify key stakeholders and interest groups in their jurisdiction in need of Zika health literature and education. 
4) Formulate a health education plan for Zika virus in their jurisdiction. 

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Katie Wagoner, MPH, MCHES®

PHRASES: Public Health Reaching Across Sectors – Tools for Collaboration and Examples from Student Field Placements
Michelle L Carvalho, MPH, MCHES®

Cross Sector Engagement for Health and Climate Adaptation
Meg Sansivero, MPH and Paul Schramm, MPH, MS

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Demystifying Publishing in SOPHE Peer Reviewed Journals

1.5 Advanced

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This session focuses on how arts can have a powerful connection in public health education. 

Learning Objective: Describe at least three researched measures on the effects of arts on various health measures.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Jeanine Robitaille, MS, CHES®

Presenters
Jesus Ramirez-Valles, PhD, MPH, Kathleen Roe, PhD, Cheryl Merzel, PhD, Jody Early, PhD, MCHES, Melissa Valerio, PhD, Danielle Brittain, PhD

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Results and Lessons Learned from a Digital Technology Initiative Focusing on Young People Living with HIV

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This session will describe the implementation, lessons learned, and outcomes from a SPNS Demonstration Initiative.  The initiative used social media and digital technologies to improve engagement, retention in care, and outcomes along the HIV care continuum (e.g., medication adherence, viral suppression) for youth and young adults living with HIV.  A total of ten demonstration sites across the U.S. developed and demonstrated unique, innovative, and culturally competent social media and digital technology interventions to improve HIV health outcomes.  All sites saw improvement in at least one outcome.  This session will also give a preview of articles from a future focus issue of Health Promotion Practice featuring the initiative, and describe replication resources for use by health educators.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Describe three examples of how digital technology approaches were tested to improve HIV health outcomes for young people living with HIV. 

2. Identify three platforms that can be used in developing social media and digital technology HIV care interventions.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Tamara Mason, MPH, CHES®

Presenters
John Hannay, MTS, MCHES, Ronald A. Brooks, PhD

Agenda - Thursday, March 26, 2020


Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Keeping Issues Relevant: Zika Virus Update

1.0 Advanced

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Background: Zika is a viral disease spread by an infected mosquito and can be sexually transmitted. Zika can cause birth defects like microcephaly and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Focus groups were used to establish knowledge, beliefs and behaviors related to Zika in NJ-based travelers planning to visit Zika-affected areas. Methods: Three focus groups of 6-8 participants were held in Teaneck, NJ. The discussion guide used was developed based on the World Health Organization’s ‘Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice surveys, Zika virus disease and potential complications’ resource pack and constructs of the Health Belief Model. Results: Most participants did not feel at risk for Zika virus and knew the virus was transmitted by mosquitoes, but few knew about sexual transmission. Most participants believed Zika only affected pregnant women/fetuses. Conclusion: Travelers’ lack of Zika knowledge demonstrates the need for more effective health education targeted to this population.

Learning Objectives: 

1 Explain the components of a focus group and how to conduct one 
2) Discuss the focus group study I conducted regarding Zika virus 
3) Describe the constructs of the Health Belief Model used, and 
4) Summarize key themes and conclusions 

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Joseph D. Visker, PhD, MCHES®

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Perceptions of Zika Virus in 2019
Krista Reale, MA, CHES®

Agenda - Friday, March 27, 2020


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

New CDC Resources to Enhance Your Health Education Practice

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The CDC tackles major health problems causing death and disability, and promotes a strong, well-resourced workforce at the national, state and local levels. This session will highlight new resources to strengthen health education practice in schools, communities, worksites and healthcare settings.  Learn about the latest guides, toolkits, and initiatives such as the Health Education Curriculum Analysis Tool (HECAT); tobacco best practice user guides for youth engagement, health equity, health communication; and injury-related resources addressing suicide prevention, aging without injury, and data science.

At the end of this session participants will be able to:

1. Describe at least three resources from CDC’s various divisions to support implementation of health education interventions in schools and communities.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator 
Angela Mickalide, PhD, MCHES®

Advancing Health Education in Schools: Updates from CDC’sDivision of Adolescent and School Health
Leigh E. Szucs, PhD, CHES®

Preventing HPV-associated Cancers: Updates from CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control
Nikki Hayes, MPH

What’s New in Tobacco Best Practice User Guides: Updates from CDC’s Office of Smoking & Health
Michon Mabry, MPH and Stephanie Andersen, MPA

Preventing Injuries: Strategic Initiatives of CDC’s Division of Injury Prevention
Judith R. Qualters, PhD, MPH

Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Tips and Tools for Advocating for Improving Health for All

1.5 Advanced

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While current curricula in many health education programs devote a variety of subject-specific courses to the other competencies required of health educators, there are often no unique courses focusing on the development of advocacy skills. The presentation that follows provides a comprehensive evaluation of one department’s fostering of advocacy skills in the training of their students. Phone interviews were conducted with a sample of internship site coordinators (n = 12), and quantitative surveys were directed to all program faculty (n = 8) and a representative sample of recent graduates (n = 43). Analyses revealed that competency seven skills are important to the growing health education and promotion workforce, from the perspective of both recent graduates and internship site coordinators. Program faculty indicated that advocacy instruction does currently take place in the curriculum. However, it has a limited focus, and the content varies widely across courses and instructors.

By the end of the session, participants will be able to outline the perceived importance of integrating advocacy and social change within the undergraduate, health education curriculum from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. 

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Kay Deaner, MEd, RN, CHES®

The Art and Science of Undergraduate Health Advocacy Pedagogy: Assessing the Integration, Instruction, and Application of Advocacy for Social Change within the Health Education Curriculum and Early-Career Practice
Christina Jones, PhD

Empowering Health Activists to Build a Movement Through a Fellowship Program
Amanda Gabarda, EdD, MPH, NBC-HWC and Camille Clark, EdD

Organization and Implementation of an Annual LGBTQ Statewide Lobby Day
Eric Conrad, PhD and Kelly Corrine Hall, MPH, CHES®

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

SOPHE's Role as a SPA in Entry-level School Health Education Teacher Preparation

1.0 Advanced

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In 2015, the SOPHE Board of Trustees voted to pursue Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) recognition for entry-level school health teacher preparation. A team of higher education faculty and practicing school health educators created six standards for professional preparation of baccalaureate school health educators, which were approved by CAEP in 2019.  This presentation will introduce the six standards and 28 components, and outline SOPHE’s next steps as a SPA and how SOPHE members can be involved in this important quality assurance effort.  

Learning Objectives
At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1) Describe major topic areas covered by SOPHE’s 6 SPA standards for entry level teacher preparation in health education.
2) Identify how you can become involved in SOPHE’s SPA processes for a strong quality assurance system in teacher preparation for school health education.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Gayle Walter, PhD, MPH, CHES®

Presenters
Susan F. Goekler, PhD, MCHES®, Deborah Fortune, PhD, FAAHE, and Elaine Auld, MPH, MCHES®

Poster Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Poster Promenade 1

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Poster Promenade- This session is available for 1.0 Entry Level CECH, applied to both CHES, CPH and MCHES.Agenda and Speakers


Moderator
Larrell L. Wilkinson, PhD, MSPH, CHES

Theory of Planned Behavior Path Model Predicting Latinx/Hispanic College Student Condom Use
Eric Conrad, PhD, MA, CHES

A Program Evaluation of a Pilot Service-Learning Intervention: Improving Fruit/Vegetable Intake Among Older Adults
Audra L. Gollenberg, PhD

Self-Reported Mentorship Needs and Preferences of Health Education and Promotion Students
Ashley V. Parks, DrPH, MPH, MBA, MTech, MCHES, CPH, CPHQ, HACP, CSSBB, CPHRM, CHTS-IM, PMP, CS-MC, CPPS

Our Role in Promoting Health Education Specialists
Nicolette Warren Powe, DrPH, MS, MCHES

Campus Readiness: Preventing and Responding to an Active Threat
Sely-Ann Headley, PhD, MPH

The Connection between Religious Involvement & Performance of Health Promoting Behaviors among African American Men: Findings from the Healthy Eating Activity Rest Together (HEART) Matters Study
Larrell Wilkinson, PhD, MSPH, CHES