Agenda - Monday, April 6, 2020


Poster Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Poster Pomenade 2B: Student Posters

1.0 Entry

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Overview

Poster Promenade- This session is available for 1.0 Entry Level CECH, applied to both CHES, CPH and MCHES.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Elaine Auld, MPH, MCHES

Exploring Identity Formation and Identity Salience Among Sexuality Educators 
Caitlin Holden, MS, CHES - Awarded Intern, R. Brick Lancaster Community Health Internship

Falling for Smartphones: A Personalized Message-Based Intervention to Reduce Injury from Smartphone Use While Walking
Brian Pugliese, MA - Fellow, SOPHE/CDC Student Fellowship in Injury Prevention

Harm Reduction in Little Five Points
Sarah Febres-Cordero, BSN, RN - Fellow, SOPHE/CDC Student Fellowship in Injury Prevention

Attitudes, Intent and Social Norms for Exercise and healthy Eating among African Americans with End Stage Renal Disease: A Qualitative Study
Jessica Woodard, BA - Fellow, SOPHE Student Fellowship in Patient Engagement


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Emerging Health Equity Issues at the Borderland

1.5 Advanced

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Overview

We share insights and lessons learned from a community needs assessment of food access and availability in El Paso, TX, and Juárez, MX. The Paso del Norte Institute for Healthy Living (IHL) partnered with The Food Trust to complete a needs assessment of food access and availability. Community needs were identified through surveys, mapping, key informant interviews, and focus groups. Stakeholders agreed to change the environmental food systems and strengthen partnerships and coalitions to address food insecurity in the region. Participants prioritized three approaches: 1) Develop innovative strategies to increase SNAP participation; 2) Develop partnerships with food retailers to provide health screenings/education and SNAP outreach at stores in high-need communities, and 3) Develop a Healthy Food Financing Initiative to increase healthy food retail opportunities in prioritized areas. As a result, the In-Store Coalition and HFFI Taskforce were established.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify at least two strategies to improve food access and availability that would be relevant for their community.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Robert Rinck, MPH

Health Promotion Resulting in Community-driven Environmental Modifications in a U.S.-Mexico Border Community to Address Substance Use Disorder (SUD), HIV and Related Disparities
Dennis O Nyachoti, MPH

Social Justice in the Borderlands: Using Agenda-setting to Improve Border Health Inequities and Impact Health Disparities
Sarah Ruiz MPH, RD, LD, CDE

Leveraging Partnerships to Improve our Community Food Environment: Lessons Learned from a Healthy Restaurant Initiative in the US -Mexico Border Regions
Rebecca Gallegos, MPH

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A Spotlight on Current Rural Health Education

1.0 Entry

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Overview

This workshop will help participants understand rural health and health care challenges; analyze the systemic relationships between these challenges and conditions that affect health outcomes. Additionally, participants will understand the assets of rural communities, as rural communities are developing and adapting innovative solutions to address some of the most substantial economic, geographic and social challenges that influence health and health care. 
Understanding not only the challenges that rural and frontier communities face but also the drivers behind them is key to discovering how to more meaningfully engage leaders when designing initiatives, policies and developing funding programs. This session will present a framework for understanding the factors at play in rural health disparities, and a strategic approach public health leaders can use to advocate with state and federal funders to ensure that programs, policies, and research initiatives are more rural-relevant.

Learning Objective:

1. Apply a systems lens to understanding the social determinants of health are inextricably connected in reinforcing and balancing parts of a larger system and how these elements can drive both positive and negative changes in rural communities.
2. Reflect on how local, state, and national health leaders, funders, policymakers, researchers, and program managers can appropriately engage rural communities as partners and experts when designing policy, research, and program initiatives."

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
 F. Jeannine Everhart, PhD, MPH, MBA, CHES®

Trends in the use of Evidence-Based Practices in Rural Health Systems
Coleman Tanner, MPH, CHES®

Tackling Rural Health Issues: Building a Comprehensive Partnership Network of Healthcare Systems, Community Partners, and Academic Institutions
F. Jeannine Everhart, PhD, MPH, MBA, CHES®


Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Raising the Need for Food Access Education by Collaboration

1.0 Advanced

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Overview

Strategic collaborations with schools and community partners can provide an opportunity for all constituents to actively change the culture of health for school age children. Positively impacting the lifestyle choices of children can have a direct impact on the choices a family makes about their health. The purpose of this project was to thoughtfully design a health-related after-school program for elementary school children who reside in an underserved community using a Community Based Participatory Research approach. CBPR is one method whereby researchers and community partners intentionally work together to cultivate culturally appropriate interventions to address physical activity and nutrition education in schools. Through a mixed methods approach, researchers identified physical activity and nutrition themes from parents, teachers, and administrators that resulted in statistically significant changes in the health of the children who participated in the program.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify five ways to develop and maintain community and school partnerships.
2. Describe the facilitators and barriers to engaging in community-based participatory research.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Amos O Aduroja, PhD, MSPH

Communities, Collaborations and Commitment: A Physical Activity and Nutrition After School Program for Children
E’tienne Easley, MSA, Kara Hamilton, PhD and Melissa Powell, MEd, RD

Role of Health Education in Changing Mindset Among Food Pantry Staff from Simply Feeding People to Being a Resource of Healthy Food Options: Combating Chronic Diseases in the Low- Income Population
Akinwale Akingbule, MPH and Dominique Cobbs, MPH, CHES®


Agenda - Tuesday, April 7, 2020


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Environmental Health: CDC

1.0 Entry

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Overview

Health educators need quality data to do their jobs effectively. Easily accessible, standardized data are essential to inform needs assessments, identify social vulnerabilities and health disparities, plan effective programs, and evaluate efforts. CDC’s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking Network) has data and resources to help health educators identify and address current and emerging community health issues and concerns. The primary way to access Tracking data is through the Data Explorer. The Data Explorer displays data in customizable maps, charts, and tables. In this session, participants will learn how to access the Tracking Network and perform Data Explorer queries. Participants will learn how to customize the data display and how to save and share the outputs. Session exercises will utilize case studies to demonstrate the real world applications of Tracking Network data to health education practice.

Learning Objectives:

1. Perform a query on the Tracking Network’s Data Explorer and customize the data display
2. Describe the utility of Tracking Network data for health education practice

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Lauren A. Moshyedi, MS, CHES, EMT

CDC’s Tracking Network: A Data Resource to Inform Action and Improve Public Health
Holly Wilson, MHSE, MCHES® and Ann Ussery-Hall, MPH, MCHES®


Oral Session12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Best Practices and Health Education with Fatherhood

1.5 Advanced

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Overview

Introduction: Maternal and child health (MCH) promotion is a focus of public health.  Evidence exists that a father’s health has a profound impact on their family.  It is critical that public health professionals are trained to understand the health promotion needs of fathers. Description:  This presentation will describe the University at Albany MCH Program’s pedagogical approaches to integrate fatherhood health promotion into curricula, including: a book club with fathers; an exhibit project detailing fathers’ perspectives of their health needs; and incorporating fatherhood issues in course materials.  Recommendations:  The presentation will conclude with recommendations on how to incorporate the health promotion of fathers into academic programs, as well as accessing professional development on this topic beyond the academic institution.  Reflections will be shared on how the public health workforce can improve our incorporation of this priority population in our efforts.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Discuss the importance of focusing on health promotion for fathers in the context of overall family health and well-being.
2. Describe three ways an academic institution can prepare public health professionals, especially health educators, to prioritize health promotion interventions for fathers.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Jennifer Banas, MPH, MSEd, EdD, CHES®

Pedagogical Approaches for Incorporating “Fatherhood” into Professional Development and Training for Public Health Professionals for Overall Family Health Promotion 

Christine Bozlak, PhD, MPH

Like Father, Like Son: The Influence of Fathers on Young Black Men's Health Seeking Behaviors
Ashley Jones, PhD, MPH, CHES®

Preparing Professionals to Engage Fathers: Father-Inclusive Education as a Catalyst for Change
Latrice Rollins, PhD, MSW

Oral Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Changing Systems in Global Health Education with Women and Students

1.0 Advanced

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Overview

The impact of peer public health education programme on adolescent students’ knowledge of HIV/AIDS and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients. Quasi-experimental design was adopted on 156 Junior Class students made up of 74 males and 82 females. Mean, standard deviation and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used for data analysis. Results revealed that the students with peer education training attained higher knowledge of HIV/AIDS and showed greater positive attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients.

Learning Objective:

1. Positive impact of peer public health education programme on adolescent students’ knowledge of HIV/AIDS and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients.
2. Negative effect of lack of peer public health education on students’ knowledge of HIV/AIDS and attitude towards HIV/AIDS patients.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Latrice Rollins, PhD

Adolescent Students’ Knowledge of & Attitude Towards People Living with HIV/AIDS: The Impact of a Peer Public Health Education Program in Abia State, Nigeria
Ursula Nnabueze, PhD and Liesl Nydegger, PhD, MPH

Health Education Programs for Disadvantaged Women in Bangladesh
Kamrun Mustafa, PhD CHES®, Fredanna McGough, PhD and Mainul Mustafa, MPA, CHES®

Poster Session3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Poster Promenade 3

1.0 Entry

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Overview

Poster Promenade- This session is available for 1.0 Entry Level CECH, applied to both CHES, CPH and MCHES.

Agenda and Speakers

Moderator
Tara M. Lutz, Ph.D., M.P.H., MCHES®

The Community Action Poverty Simulation: A Powerful Learning Experience in Public Health to Improve Understanding of and Attitudes Towards Poverty
Amanda Gabarda, EdD, MPH, NBC-HWC

Preparing the Next Generation: Strategies to Include Students with Disabilities in Health Education and Implications for the Field
Tara Lutz, PhD, MPH, CHES®

Improving Access to Evidence-based Diabetes Self-managementbPractices at a Student-run Free Clinic: Results from a Six-month Study
Nadia Quainoo, MPH

Implementation of Sexual Health Education in Elementary Grade Levels Leads to Higher Knowledge of STI/HIV Prevention and Contraception Use in Young Adulthood
Ronald Williams, PhD, CHES®

Exploring How Characteristics Associated with Perinatal Community Health Shape Method of Delivery Outcomes in New York State Neighborhoods
Christina Ventura-DiPersia, DPH, MPH